CORPORATE SPONSOR OPPORTUNITIES

To learn more about the sponsorship opportunities offered for the 2019 United States Conference of Mayors in Honolulu, please download the packet below.

HOST CITY SPONSORS

koa

KOA

($500,000 and up)

The koa towers above all as the monarch of the forest. Its large trunk and strength made it ideal for the construction of the canoes that transported those who bravely navigated our waters. Its value derives from its rich beauty, making it the wood of choice for artists and craftsmen.

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mastercard logo
ohia

OHIA

($300,000 – $499,999)

The ohia is a pioneer, establishing itself on fresh lava flows to create large stands in vast areas of the forest. Through natural succession, a few very prominent ohia will prevail over the forest. Ohia lehua, with its striking red flowers, are sacred to Pele and its image invokes beauty, energy and rejuvenation.

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mastercard logo
mastercard logo
mastercard logo
kukui

KUKUI

($150,000 – $299,999)

The practical kukui was brought to our islands thousands of years ago during the time of the Polynesian migration. Those courageous voyagers carried the humble kernel that bestowed light, fuel, food, lumber and other uses. The official tree of Hawai‘i and the symbol of enlightenment, the kukui embellishes forested hillsides and valleys with its silvery, pale-green leaves.

AECOM

Bank of America Merrill Lynch

BYD

Lyft

Uber

milo

MILO

($75,000 – $149,999)

The beautiful milo shaded the homes of alii and graced places of religious significance throughout Polynesia and Micronesia. Its wood was specifically crafted into umeke ai, the poi bowls that are at the center of maintaining kalo traditions of kanaka maoli. The attractive wood of interlaced colors, takes to a beautiful polish, is unsurpassed for calabashes, containers, carved objects and canoe paddles.

American Savings Bank & Hawaiian Electric | HEI

Covanta

Jacobs

Kaiser Permanente

ulu and kamani

ULU and KAMANI

($25,000 – $74,999)

The majestic ulu spreads wide its canopy to offer shade and food. Planted as a valuable food source, the tree often signifies the location of a significant settlement. The origin of this distinctive tree is told in a moolelo as being the body form of the god Ku, who transformed himself into the Ulu tree to feed villagers during a time of famine. The legend reminds us to express gratefulness for the riches of the earth. Its wood is fashioned into pahu, poi boards and alaia.

The Kamani is a large attractive tree that can reach heights of 60 feet high. Its reddish-brown hardwood is used to carve varied items from canoes to food bowls. The seed, leaves, gum and bark were believed to have medicinal properties. In the old days an extract from the fruit was used to make a brown dye to color tapa cloth. Often planted around heiau, temples, Kamani was mentioned in early Hawaiian chants, and is still considered a sacred tree in parts of Polynesia.

ABC Stores

Airbnb

ANA

Central Pacific Bank

Expedia

Hawaiian Paradise Coffee

HDR

International Assn. of Fire Fighters

ITI

Kiewit

OluKai

Stanford Carr Development

Stantec

Synagro

WSP

mamane

MAMANE

Alaska Airlines

Aloha Beer

Bank of Hawaii

Brown and Caldwell

First Hawaiian Bank

Hawaiian Air

Pasha Hawaii

Young Brothers